Black Millennials for Flint’s National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

October 22, 2017

Black Millennials for Flint’s National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week 2017

WASHINGTON, DC –  Black Millennials for Flint (BM4F) is pleased to announce the kick-off of National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week 2017, October 22–28th. BM4F will participate in outreach and education activities designed to raise local awareness about the danger of lead exposure and poisoning, and educate parents on how to reduce exposure to lead in their environment, prevent its serious health effects, and learn about the importance of testing children for lead.

National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week 2017 is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The goal is to encourage organized, local community events, and to empower families and other stakeholders to take action. Our goal during this week is to also connect individuals with our mission which is to empower communities to take action and advocate against the crisis of lead exposure specifically in African American & Latino communities.

Activities and events planned for the weeklong observance include: a social media campaign spreading awareness regarding lead poisoning prevention as well as the official release of our  BM4F Community Advocacy Resource Page on our website that will be stocked with tools to encourage likeminded organizations to incorporate lead prevention strategies into their respective advocacy platforms.  


Although lead in gasoline and paint has been banned in the United States since the 1970s, lead exposure and poisoning is still a problem, especially for children. Lead is mostly found in lead-based paint, which was used in homes before 1978; however, it can also be found in the water that travels through lead pipes or in the soil around a house. Lead poisoning is caused by accidentally swallowing or breathing in the lead dust created by old paint that has cracked and chipped. Children are particularly at risk, often becoming lead poisoned by putting their hands or other lead-contaminated objects in their mouths, eating paint chips found in homes from peeling or flaking lead-based paint, or playing in lead-contaminated soil. According the CDC, there is no known safe level of lead exposure, and even low levels can damage the brain and
kidneys, as well as the reproductive, cardiovascular, circulatory, and immune systems. Lead is especially dangerous for children’s developing brains, causing reduce cognitive ability and attention span, impaired aptitude for learning, and increased risk for behavioral problems. However, the good news is that the problem is largely preventable with increased education and testing.

We encourage local organizations and community members to continue to work together to create a #LeadFreeUSA.  “A threat to justice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”–Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  

Contact

To learn more, please contact:

LaTricea Adams, MAT, EdS | Founder, President

Media@blackmillenials4flint.org

 

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Black Millennials For Flint (#BM4F) is a grassroots, environmental justice and civil rights organization with the purpose of bringing like-minded organizations together to collectively take action and advocate against the crisis of lead exposure specifically in African American & Latino communities throughout the nation.

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